Bacon & Bone Broth Sprouted Refried Beans


For a long while now, we have concentrated on eating an animal-based diet for radiant health, healthy babies, a happy stomach, and simplicity.


If you have ailments of whatever sort, it can be great to go through a process of eating strictly animal foods, mostly from herbivores. The cleanest elimination diet you could use when you want to clear the body of what ails it and to shine a light on what exactly is making you sick, could be to eat just steaks sprinkled with sea salt. YUM.


We did that for a long time and so much good came of it - glowing skin, weight loss, healing from anemia, psoriasis, gut issues, and oh yes... two amazingly healthy babies back-to-back at ages 37 and 39.


Not to mention, or I guess to totally mention the unmentionable: I never realized how much most food hurts the gut and causes bloating, belching and tooting. You will feel like a new person with zero toots and zero stomach discomfort.


Then, maybe when you've gone months and are getting over a pure meat diet, you start introducing broth, raw dairy, other animal foods and amazingly - they are so good too!


Then, maybe a while after that you want to eat some other stuff again and here's something to add to the list.


There are lots of ideas about what should and what should not be eaten in this world, for a variety of reasons. Beans, on one hand, are babies! OMG! Each one is a future bean plant. And when we crush a bean between our teeth, we crush it, eliminating the chance that it will be born and produce beans. So mom and dad plants imbibe the beans with toxic compounds to prevent us from eating all of their future babies and grand babies, and thus keep the bean species continuing.


You may take that in and decide - yes, this is probably why my intestines hurt after eating beans. I would agree with you and avoid eating beans out at restaurants for this reason (and because they would be laden with toxins and bad oils too).

However, there's an amazing thing you can do: You can sprout the bean! Once you transform the bean from a hard solid mass, to a softened, germinated thing, you transform the nutrients and deplete it's anti-nutrients (which make it so tough on the gut to digest - mama trying to keep you from eating her little bean babies).


Along with sprouting the beans in this recipe, it also calls for a whole pack of bacon, as well as a jar of gelatinous beef bone broth. Let's dig in:


This recipe is so delicious. I have made it countless times and it's a solid side dish to serve along steak, tacos, you name it. Plus, you cook it in a slow cooker over night and the scent it brings to the house is truly mouth-watering.


We're going to use a whole package of beans to produce a mega batch. It freezes beautifully and is just too much trouble to sprout the beans and make a tiny amount at a time. I make a huge batch and will eat it for dinner, then pack it into mason quart jars and freeze. Make sure you don't pack it too tightly, leave 2" at the top of your glass jars before you freeze them, so they don't crack. And you should get 6 or so jars for future meals.


It makes it so easy to have this special bone broth bacon refried side dish that just needs to be reheated.


By the way, we carry everything for this dish at Copia Farmstore, besides the Ancho chili powder.


You will need:

1 pack - Organic Shagbark Pinto Beans

1 jar - Copia/Fond Bone Broth

1 pack - Pasture-Raised Bacon

Sea Salt

Ancho Chili Powder

Fenugreek Seeds



1. Use a whole pack of local, organic Shagbark Pinto Beans. Put them in a large vessel and add clean water (no city tap water, since this would prevent germination). Add 2 tablespoons sea salt to the water. Make sure the water is 3" above the bean line. Soak overnight.


2. Drain and rinse the beans of the soak water.









3. To the slow cooker add beans, 1 jar bone broth, 1 pack of bacon (frozen is fine), Ancho chili powder, and fenugreek seeds (these further may help digesting the beans. Hold off on salting until before eating.


4. Cook on high or medium, depending on how hot your cooker runs. If you're not sure, set to medium and check on the beans in the morning. If they're not totally mushy, turn up the heat.


Make sure you check on them and give a few stirs with a spoon so the bacon and broth get distributed evenly.





5. Once the beans are mushy, turn off the heat and let them cool a little.


6. Put them in the Vitamix or powerful blender, or even better and blend them up with an emersion blender as much as you like - just a little for some chunks, or a lot for no chunks.


Serve, cheers & enjoy a dish of toot-free beans!


Top with cordito (it's a Central American version of sauerkraut we sell in the Farmstore) and sour cream.